New interpretive signs at Edmonds Marsh

The impacts of development as well as cleanup and restoration efforts are explained on one of the interpretive panels
Mar 12, 2013

Thanks to a generous grant from the Hazel Miller Foundation, eight new interpretive signs have been produced and installed along the walkway at the Edmonds Marsh.

These signs were designed for the City of Edmonds by Owen Caddy, who has designed signs that are located at Marina Beach, Brackett’s Landing, Olympic Beach and the Public Fishing Pier.

The Edmonds Marsh is one of the few urban saltwater estuaries remaining in the Puget Sound area.

It is home to numerous species of wildlife, and is also a critical rest stop for migrating birds traveling along the Pacific Flyway.

The new interpretive signs will give visitors a much better idea of the ecological importance of the marsh and the processes that are occurring there.

The changes that have occurred in the marsh have mirrored the settlement and development of the City of Edmonds since 1870.

The impacts of development as well as cleanup and restoration efforts are explained on one of the interpretive panels that includes an historical timeline.

Another of the panels shows Edmonds Marsh as a part of a bird migration corridor with birds flying from Arctic nesting grounds to wintering areas south of here and stopping to rest in Edmonds.

These illustrations give the visitor a real sense of where they are in space and time, and the importance of the Edmonds Marsh as part of a bigger ecological system.

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